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Art, research, education

Action research project: appendix

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Index of Appendix

1. Test tile template

2.How to glaze instruction sheet

3. Skills sharing chart

4. Cd recording of glaze test discussion with students and transcriptions

5. Student Self assessment form

6. Action Research questionnaire

7. Action Research Questionnaire All 10 Responses

APPENDIX 1. TEST TILE TEMPLATE

Page in recipe book

TEMPERATURE              NAME OF GLAZE

SINGLE

DOUBLE      THICKNESS OF APPLICATION

TRIPLE

RECIPE WRITTEN ON UNGLAZED SIDE

TYPE OF CLAY         WHITE SLIP/EMBOSSSED

TYPE OF CLAY                       WHITE SLIP/EMBOSSED

APPENDIX 2.

HOW TO GLAZE A PIECE OF FIRED CERAMIC

BEFORE MIXING

Open the glaze bucket or container and pour off excess water into a jug and keep to one side.

(you may need to add this all back in after testing for thickness)

MIX GLAZE LEFT IN BUCKET THOROUGHLY

With a fork or stick or your hand

TEST FOR THICKNESS

By dropping a fingerful of glaze onto the back of your object, or dip a similar piece of bisqueware (fired clay) into bucket.

GETTING THE THICKNESS CORRECT

Can be different for each glaze

clear/transparent = postage stamp thickness

check test tiles which are standardised with three thicknesses single, double and triple to see how thickness alters the finished look

IF TOO THICK

Add back water gradually, and test thickness each time until correct or required thickness is achieved.

APPLICATION

CAN BE BY BRUSHING, DIPPING OR POURING

ALWAYS MIX GLAZE BETWEEN APPLICATIONS

ASK YOUR TUTOR, TECHNICIAN OR FELLOW STUDENTS FOR A DEMONSTRATION

APPENDIX 3.

Skill sharing chart

People signed below are willing to answer questions or show how to do a technique.

If you are confident in something please add your signature-thanks.

GLAZING

(SEE INSTRUCTIONS ON GLAZE CUPBOARD DOOR)

Students 1,3 and 10

1 & 2 PIECE MOLDS

Students 6 and 7

USING SLIP FOR DECORATION

Student 6

COILING

SLIP-CASTING

Student 6

THROWING

Student 8

APPENDIX 4.

Transcription of C.D

discussions of my action research project with the students.

9.3.10 participants

Myself

STUDENT 1

STUDENT 4

STUDENT 7

STUDENT 10

16.3.10 Participants

Myself

STUDENT R

STUDENT 8

STUDENT C

STUDENT 9

STUDENT 7

STUDENT 4

Do you feel inspired by tests you see to do your own?

All 4 9.3.10 participants found the glaze test tiles useful as a learning resource.

None of the 16.3.10 participants had done experimentation and test tiles at the time of the discussions

All had felt confusion at first, but found the template helpful.

To distinguish thickness difference

STUDENT R

“pretty self explanatory.”

“Quite daunted by it.”

STUDENT 4

“By the time we think about glaze its too late…I always look at your tiles because they’re there”

STUDENT 7

“Im realising that its difficult to do the tests in such a short time.”

APPENDIX 4. TRANSCRIPTION

STUDENT 1 & 10

Both had already mixed their own glazes and thought this was a wonderful way of learning about glazes.

Discussion about the recipe book

STUDENT R

“how accessible is this?”

STUDENT 8

“we have no idea what’s in the recipe book”

STUDENT R

suggests idea: numbers on tiles and then on recipe page

On Throwing and skill sharing

Student 8

“Its more about practice and finding your own rhythm…..not something that can be taught.”

Student 9

“I was doing it again after some time and it all came back to me.”

Student 7

“Yes that’s right I asked student 8 to teach me to throw.”

I will make a chart for people to sign up to help each other on the days when the tutor and I aren’t here. Students on the list  will answer questions and show others what to do next term if you need to do a glaze test.

Student 10 and 1 will be willing to help with glaze tests. Anyone else want to sign up?

STUDENT 7

“I could teach people about paper porcelain or er…..what else can I do….one piece moulds, and two piece moulds.”

“Helpful to know beforehand that you have to learn as if you have to teach someone else afterwards, as I would learn it better.”

APPENDIX 4.

TRANSCRIPTION

All 9.3.10 agreed they would like to be shown techniques whether they were relevant or not. This gave me the opportunity to explain the teaching and learning methods, including

Failure knowledge

STUDENT R

“Learnt by the first one being too thin to make the next ones thicker.”

BA Ceramics courses

STUDENT 1

Talked about letter received saying that BA Ceramics course at Bucks was closing.

“Really wanted to go there because I live there.”

STUDENT 4

Wondered whether to attend interview the next day, as student 1 had received the letter which had said the course was closing.

Had already been accepted at Cardiff.

APPENDIX 5.

STUDENT SELF ASSESSMENT FORM

UAL DIPLOMA IN ART & DESIGN PART 1 LEVEL 3

STUDENT SELF ASSESSMENT AND STAFF FEEDBACK FORM

Area of Study (please circle as appropriate):

Fine Art Painting/ Fine Art Sculpture/visual Communications

Design for Performance/Fashion & Textiles Design/3D Design

Student Name…………………………………………………Date…………………………

Please word process or write very clearly, sign, date, and hand in completed with your work for assessment.

Unit one, Art & Design Research Methods (approx 100 words)

Explain how our contextual research has informed your ideas and understanding on the project. What visual research did you undertake?

Unit two, Art & Design Ideas Development (approx 100 words)

How was drawing and recording useful in the development of your work? What problems did you encounter and how did you resolve them?

Unit three, Art & Design Materials and Methods (approx 100) words

What technical skills did you learn/develop during the project? Dd you explore a range of possible processes?

Unit four, Evaluation and Reflection (approx 100 words)

How were you able to reflect upon the progress of your work? What were the most and least successful aspects of your project and what could you do further given more time?

Student signature ………………………                    Date………………

Staff feedback on progress & outcome of project

Less than

satis      satifactory       good         very  good              outstanding

Attendance and time management
Relevance and quality of research
Breadth and quality of development
Skills, materials & methods used
Quality of reflection &evaluation

Notes eg (motivation, studentship, overall performance & potential in subject area

Staff signature……………………………………………….                              Date…………………………………..

APPENDIX 6.

ACTION RESEARCH QUESTIONNAIRE

I have made a glaze from raw chemicals using scales I have done ceramics before coming to foundation I learnt how to read a glaze test tile during my ceramics foundation course I chose ceramics as my main subject I am going on to a ceramic BA course I have made a glaze test tile

And /or glaze test and/or any other test or experiment

yes
no
I learnt a technique from a fellow student I taught a fellow student a technique I shared my thoughts about another students work with them “I discussed my glaze test results with other students if they asked me to” “I found help from other students essential on days with no staff in the studio” “I found the chart for skill sharing really helpful”
yes
no

Student questionnaire page 2.

Thank you for helping me out with my action research project.

Please write about…

If you found doing glaze tests and experiments helpful

(or not), and why?

Please sign here to agree to me using your comments in my action research blog.

…………………………………………………………………………

Please email your comments to

m.helal@wimbledon.arts.ac.uk

APPENDIX 7.

ACTION RESEARCH QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES

“I have made a glaze from raw chemicals using scales” “I have done ceramics before coming to foundation” “I learnt how to read a glaze test tile during my ceramics foundation course” “I chose ceramics as my main subject” I am going on to a ceramic BA course I have made a glaze test tile

And /or glaze test and/or any other test or experiment

yes 7 4 10 8 6 10
no 3 6 2 4
I learnt a technique from a fellow student I taught a fellow student a technique I shared my thoughts about another students work with them I discussed my glaze test results with other students if they asked me to I found help from other students essential on days with no staff in the studio I found the chart for skill sharing really helpful
yes 9 5 10 8 6 10
no 1 5 2 4

APPENDIX 7.

ACTION RESEARCH QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES

Thank you for helping me out with my action research project.

Please write about..

If you found doing glaze tests and experiments helpful (or not) and why?

Student 1

“Learning about how to make glazes from scratch I found very important and a huge section of learning about ceramics in general.”

“I found the tiles available with glazes on them excellent for understanding layers, recipes, and colours achieved.”

“I found wall charts with simple directions helpful to remind me how a sequence of steps is carried out. Being able to try and experiment something out for myself really helped me to learn by trial and error. Wall charts are also helpful with clay types (unfired, fired glazed etc) also temperature charts for firing. Glaze recipe book with samples, photos could be helpful, or other students recipes etc.”

Student 2

“I found doing glaze tests helpful because it gave me an indication of how my piece might look when finished so helped in my decision making process.”

Student 3

“I found it extremely useful. It was nice to be able to learn from my own mistakes and get some really interesting results.”

Student 4

“Normally I rely on the already glaze tests which are kept in the studio- I find they are useful enough for my studies. I have dons a few tests myself in the past and they have had interesting outcomes, but to me there isn’t any difference than the ones I have done and ones which already have been done. But I guess they are tests I can keep and record and I get to understand the thickness of it.”

APPENDIX 7.

ACTION RESEARCH QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES

Student 5

“It has been helpful as it stops me completing my work blindfolded. It allows me to see what my glazes will look like and whether I should apply more or less. It helps you to envisage the final outcome and allows you to make changes before applying a glaze to a final piece.”

Student 6

“I prefer not to use glaze tests because it is time consuming. I have only ever worked with ceramics at school or at Wimbledon so ceramics has always come with these related issues, so glaze tests just mean extra time. I think they would be helpful but I choose not to use them when I can avoid it.”

Student 7

“Really helpful because I was able to understand how the recipes and chemicals worked and reacted together.  And I learnt how a glaze can change dramatically from gram to gram of oxides for example. I made a glaze from scratch but added four different ingredients to each recipe and got four very interesting glazes on test tiles.”

“Had I not been able to test them first I could have ended up with a final project with colours and glazes I didn’t like.”

Student 8

“Gives you more of an idea of how things might turn out. Good point of reference for those who had no previous experience.”

Student 9

“Yes they allowed me to see how my final project would turn and having seen the different effects created from different numbers of layers of glaze I was able to create good effects that I would not have previously thought of or done.”

APPENDIX 7.

ACTION RESEARCH QUESTIONNAIRE RESPONSES

Student 10

“I think glaze tests and experiments are very helpful and are something students should do during foundation course. Not only were the test tiles I made during the final project useful to choose appropriate colours for my work but these were also very good practice to control thickness and thinness of glazes, which resulted in me having much more confidence in applying colour. Moreover, the tiles made me think about how the outcome of my final work could be improved more and I personally enjoyed chemical reaction happened in the kiln very much.”

Please sign here to agree to me using your comments in my action research blog

…………………………………………………………………………

Please email your comments to

m.helal@wimbledon.arts.ac.uk

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Author: pandaji

Ceramic artist, educator

2 thoughts on “Action research project: appendix

  1. Pingback: Action research project: method « Pandaji's Blog

  2. Pingback: Satisfaction Survey Results 2010-2011 « Pandaji's Blog

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